Roughtown Road One way proposal met with disdain

PLANS to make one street one way have been criticised by people living nearby – many of whom believe Tameside Council are literally going about it the wrong way.

The authority wants to make traffic on Roughtown Road, Mossley, go down from its junction with the main Manchester Road to close to its junction with High Street.

 

But even though the council has outlined one of its reasons as delivery vehicles going down from Carrhill Road then meeting a no entry sign having nowhere to turn to take place safely, it has still been met with opposition.

 

Many people believe it should be made one way going uphill, with nearby Mill Lane made one way going down.

 

In its reasons, Tameside Council says there are clear reasons why it has made the application.

 

It says: “Roughtown Road is a very steep, narrow single lane road leading from Carrhill Road to Manchester Road, Mossley.

 

“There are approximately 57 properties on this stretch of Roughtown Road.“Tameside MBC has been contacted many times regarding the issues which occur in this area when two vehicles meet or worse, when large vehicles have to reverse around the tight bends with limited or zero visibility.

“This scheme is designed to enable free flowing traffic in one direction to avoid vehicles conflicting when traveling along Roughtown Road.”

Anyone with any objections must state their case to Tameside Council by May 1, either by writing to Emma Varnam, assistant director, operations and neighbourhoods, Tameside One, Market Place, Ashton, OL6 6BH, or by e-mail trafficoperations@tameside.gov.uk.

 

Roughtown Road is not the only area where Tameside Council wants to change traffic rules.

 

It wants to impose a 20mph speed limit at the area at Hyde’s Old Dairy, close to Dukinfield Road.

 

The authority says it wants to, ‘introduce measures to meet the needs of the community and encourage slower vehicle speeds thereby enhancing road safety’.

4 Replies to “Roughtown Road One way proposal met with disdain”

  1. Should be one way down its li a death trap the speed they go up using it as a rat run to avoid the lights at mossley Station.

  2. This should actually have happened years ago. Its the correct way going one way down as its the uphill drivers who usually cause danger and blast there horns not giving a damn about anyone else. The silly notion that its one way up Roughtown and one way down Mill Lane is just that, silly and is spouted off by those who can’t be bothered driving a couple of minutes extra to the lights at Mossley station and turning right. I lived on Roughtown Road when it was tried many, many years back to make it one way uphill. It got kicked out at the first hurdle because the people who lived there were absolutely furious for lots of reasons. The traffic engineer at the time also reported one way up would be dangerous and traffic was a lot lighter then. Its not even a proper road! Its a steep, hazardous narrow country lane full of bends. Why would you want to divert masses of traffic off a busy main road to go one way up a cart track full of blind bends? Crazy idea and someone would be killed.

  3. No idea who the reporter of this has spoken to but I`ll bet it’s not the people who live there, who are the ones affected by this road. As someone else has said, it’s not a road really and if it wasn’t for the fact people lived on it the council would just close it for sure. I used to live off a side road off Roughtown and one of the resons I moved was because of the idiots speeding up it. Often struggled to get my car out because they would fly round the blind bend. There are some very selfish and dangerous motorists out there. Get this done council and make the lane safer for people.

  4. Cyclist here. Road is a death trap. We often used to cycle down Roughtown Road en route to Greenfield but it has become too dangerous over past few years. Utter maniacs coming uphill – way too fast. Either shut the road at the railway bridge or go with the “one way” downhill idea of the council’s.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *